GUNPOWDER PLOT LESSON PLAN KS1

The hot seat activity is a great way for classes to explore the actions of key figures including King James I, conspirator Robert Catesby and Guy Fawkes himself. As a follow-up activity, encourage them to write about the plot in their own words, using simple prompts such as first, next, then and finally. For example, could the plotters have been set up by the government to provide an excuse to crack down on Roman Catholics? Bonfire night 5 November — the annual commemoration of a plot to blow up the Houses of Parliament in — is just around the corner. Can students offer justifications for the characters on both sides? Bonfire night artwork is also a great way into the topic; coloured chalk on black paper or wax crayon washed over with black paint make for wonderful fireworks pictures.

The Great Fire of London. Primary historical evidence is a great way to take older students back in time. Threads collapsed expanded unthreaded. As a follow-up activity, encourage them to write about the plot in their own words, using simple prompts such as first, next, then and finally. Membership Contact us Support us About us. These resources are attached below A useful website for background information:

This bonfire night assembly created by TrueTube raises a number of debate questions.

And finally, Musical Contexts asks students to create firework sounds using different instruments or suitable sound sources in the classroom. Add a bit of sparkle to your science lessons with some Guy Fawkes-themed experiments.

These are part of the National Archives resources. And what might have happened had the gunpowder plot succeeded? Story-telling Drama and role-play Children writing.

Historical Periods Transition to university Careers with history. The Great Plague of London. For example, could the plotters have been set up by the government to provide an excuse to crack down on Roman Catholics? The hot seat activity is a great way for classes to explore the actions of key figures including King James I, conspirator Robert Catesby and Guy Fawkes himself.

Bonfire night artwork is also a great way into the topic; coloured chalk on black paper or wax crayon washed over with black paint make for wonderful fireworks pictures.

Show 25 25 50 All. With older primary students, explore the conspiracy in more detail lseson this two-part lesson plan from UK parliament. As a homework assignment, students could research and write a bonfire-themed article of their own. Encourage students to share their own experiences of the evening in a class discussion, and set them a creative writing task about a real or imagined fireworks party.

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Teaching methods Story-telling Drama and role-play Children writing Speaking, listening, discussion and debate – Oracy History and citizenship Link to related lessons on this site Primary schools Introduce the gunpowder plot using this sequencing activity from Twinkl.

Other crafty ideas include rockets made from kitchen roll tubes and sparklers made from straws and glitter. Can gunpowver offer justifications for the characters on both sides? Can they master the art of the Catherine wheel or a Roman candle? Our lesson resources will help you make this tale of gunpowder, treason and plot sparkle in the classroom. Parliament Weekwhich runs from 16 to 22 November, aims to get young people thinking about what parliamentary democracy means to them and their communities.

With the real world around them permeated by political gunpwoder, it is unsurprising that the children chose violent methods to gain ‘their’ poot ends. Or why not try a bonfire painting or collage made using tissue paper? Secondary schools Primary historical evidence is a great way to take older students back in time. There are plenty more news articles related to bonfire night hereincluding details of a crackdown on cheap fancy dress costumes that could pose a fire hazard and an investigation into how much air pollution is caused by fireworks.

The Great Fire of London. As a follow-up activity, encourage them to write about the plot in their own words, using simple prompts such as first, next, then and finally.

Guy Fawkes and the Gunpowder Plot is a cracking tale for any age group, although the complex political and religious elements are difficult for young children to understand.

I used all three methods in the p,an lessons described here, with a Year 2 class in Salford.

Gunpowder plot at key stage 1

Speaking, listening, discussion and debate – Oracy. As a group activity, students could write their own fireworks safety code or design a bonfire night safety poster.

Membership Contact us Support us About us. It starts by looking at the details of the plot and introduces the different perspectives on the story.

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Loading comments… Trouble loading? You could try making a firework in a glass using water, oil and food colouringor looking at the chemistry of fireworks and how they work. Primary historical evidence is a great way to take older students back in time. These resources are attached gunpowwder A useful website for background information: Students can use this evidence to write a report on the events, including an analysis of its weaknesses.

Working in pairs, ask pupils to put the pictures in the correct order.

How to teach Guy Fawkes | Teacher Network | The Guardian

Order by newest oldest recommendations. There are numerous activities on the Parliament Week website including an interactive game which gives students a go at being prime ministerand a second video that explains how parliament works.

Topics Teacher Network How to teach Carol Dalziel and Jacqui Dean, last updated: Bonfire night 5 November — the annual commemoration of a plot to blow up the Houses of Parliament in — is just around the corner. Bonfire night celebrations have become more elaborate over the years, as this video shows.

Introduce the gunpowder plot using this sequencing activity from Twinkl. What do they see as the pros and cons of each system? Given its links to the persecution of a religious group, do pupils think we should still celebrate bonfire night? Recent protests against the government have included similar calls for a more direct system of democracyas explored in this news article by The Day. Working in groups, students could use the article to explore the difference between parliamentary democracy and direct democracy.

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Alternatively, separate groups could work on analysing different sources before presenting them to the rest of the class. Threads collapsed expanded unthreaded.

However, we can help them to gain insights into past people’s motivations and methods through storytelling, simulation and role-play.

Finally, use the event to get students interested in democracy in the UK.